Exhibitions

Current

I can’t make you those mitts because there is a hole in my heart and my hands hurt

Jeneen Frei Njootli

Gallery 1
Mar 15 - Apr 21, 2018

Vuntut Gwitchin artist Jeneen Frei Njootli’s artistic practice engages directly with Gwich`in territory and culture through the artist’s lived experience and land based practices. Frei Njootli defines this as bushed theory - “a radical, grassroots way of being; one that requires getting some caribou blood and fiss guts on your hands.” Frei Njootli realizes this land-based methodology in the gallery by working with sounds, dust, grease, and power tools. The traces and residues of Frei Njootli’s sonic landscapes and physical markings remain once the artist’s body leaves the gallery space, reminding us of the artist’s labour, presence, and motion.

Performance
Thursday, March 15, 2018
8pm

Presented in partnership with Public Energy,  Peterborough, Ontario’s animator of contemporary dance, theatre, performance, and interdisciplinary work.

Upcoming

future generations

Tsēmā Igharas

Gallery 1
May 25 - Jul 14, 2018

future generations is an exhibition that considers the role of Indigenous futurity as a tool of survival and survivance. The work is rooted in artist Tsēmā Igharas’ understanding and embodiment of Tāłtān culture and tradition, alongside objects and materials firmly rooted in Western settler culture. Using Potlatch methodology - a ceremony of reciprocation and nation building, in which every performance of artmaking is a “ceremony that affirms and solidifies relationships to every thing and body” – Igharas challenges the colonial value systems and measurements of land and natural resources, and the impact these systems have on the cultural practices of Indigenous peoples and nations. future generations presents strategies and gestures of resistance to forms of neo-colonization – what the viewer may come to understand as acts of decolonization - and imagines possible future(s) for Indigenous peoples to exist within. Through the work in future generations Igharas encourages methods of care – for the land, and our bodies – that become modes of resistance for past/present/future generations.